The (not so) surprising impact of fixing the things that you do everyday.

I received this email from a friend that I have known for a long time. He emails from time to time about the emails that I put out, and although he has never done Systema, he has done the 28 Day Challenge. Below he writes about the two key things that have stuck with him. They are not big things, but they are the things that you do everyday, and the things that you do most regularly are the things that define you, your health and your skills.

Matt,

I wanted to write to let you know how I have benefited from the Systema way of life.
The two key methods are walking and breathing.
Walking: I began to use the suggested method, of being straight and keeping good posture. Whilst initially, it seems unnatural, the benefits are really quite outstanding. No more the curved shoulders and slouch forward, but rather the straight spine, which has helped my lower back, a problem has been with me since I was 14 and cycling. The pain was nothing too great, but would be there if I walked like a ‘bag of potatoes’.
Secondly the Breathing method: I have found it excellent in high adrenaline rushes, a good example would be a near hit whilst driving. Following the correct breathing method brings you quickly back to a relaxed state. It also aids in physical exercise (don’t really need to tell you that), but, again, it is truly amazing the way in which you can return to a ‘normal’ level.
I don’t suffer from the health problems that many of your correspondents have had, but it just goes to show how effective the practices are even in small adjustments.
Regards,
John.

These things may seem trivial, mundane, but they aren’t. Just add up the amount of time that you spend on them. These things that you are doing all day every day. I would say these are the important things. Small adjustments here can have a huge magnification in your life, health and skills.

My book, ‘Living Systema‘ helps you to work on this element of your skill set.

My very best wishes for your health and training as always,

Matt.